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Fransahay



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 60
Location: Marseille, France

 PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 8:34 pm    Post subject: IMPORTANT: SIGN PETITION NOW ! Reply with quote Back to top

Le 17 avril prochain, la chaîne américaine PBS va diffuser le documentaire intitulé "le Génocide Arménien" d'Andrew Goldberg.
Ce documentaire sera suivi d'un débat d'une durée de 25 minutes au cours duquel seront présents deux négationnistes du Génocide Arménien.
La pétition demande tout simplement l'annulation de ce débat.
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iminhokis
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Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 3321

 PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2006 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Quote:

Please use your First and Last name when signing.
One name per signature and no slogans please. Thank you.

To: Ms. Jacoba Atlas, Senior Vice President of PBS programming

It is welcome news that PBS is planning to broadcast Andrew Goldberg's "The Armenian Genocide" documentary on April 17, 2006. However, we are immensely hurt by the news that this will be followed by a 25 minute long discussion by a panel that includes two genocide deniers.

We are confident that the Armenian Genocide scholars will present a superb scholarly case, but we strongly feel that debating the Armenian Genocide is akin to arguing about the Jewish Holocaust in order to project a sense of balance. Would PBS ever contemplate such a program?

Turkish denials of the genocide are part of a state-sponsored policy of propaganda that serves only the interests of Turkey. The historical truth of the Armenian genocide has been established beyond reasonable doubt by abundant documentary and eye-witness evidence from thousands of sources. Furthermore, denialist views of genocide are already included in the film; thus the panel discussion would serve to emphasize the Turkish state's official position and undermine the non political nature of your programming.

Broadcasting the panel discussion may result in a substantial loss of support from viewers of PBS.

We the undersigned urge you not to approve the airing of the panel discussion.

Sincerely,

LINK TO SIGN THE PETITION: http://www.petitiononline.com/pbspanel/petition.html
 
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iminhokis
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Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 3321

 PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Protests Greet TV Debate on Genocide
LA Times


Panel argues Turkey's role in the Armenian massacre; it was set to air after PBS' documentary. KCET, KOCE won't show the discussion.
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Matea Gold, Times Staff Writers
February 28 2006

A taped 25-minute panel discussion that is to follow a PBS documentary about Turkey's role in the massacre of Armenians during and after World War I, scheduled to air in April, has prompted protests by thousands of Armenian Americans and two congressmen.

But Angelenos will not get a chance to see either the one-hour film, "The Armenian Genocide" by filmmaker Andrew Goldberg, or the debate featuring two academics who deny that a genocide took place and two who maintain that it did, because KCET-TV does not plan to air them.

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Instead, KCET-TV, the PBS station in Los Angeles, which has the largest ethnic Armenian community outside Armenia, will broadcast a French documentary, "Le Genocide Armenien," which the station selected in January, said Bohdan Zachary, executive director of programming.

KCET was not swayed by protests, Zachary said Monday. Station executives, he said, had never planned to air Goldberg's documentary because they preferred the French film's comprehensive take on the topic.

The Armenian genocide of 1915 to 1918 claimed the lives of about 1.2 million Armenians under the Ottoman Empire, which became the modern republic of Turkey. The Turkish government disputes that a genocide took place. April has become a time to remember those killed.

"Our decision has nothing to do with the controversy whatsoever," Zachary said. "The approach of the documentary we've selected is much more interesting…. We're spending a lot of money to acquire this film. The easy thing would be to take the PBS film at no cost."

Joining the fray is Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) and Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.). Schiff is collecting signatures for a petition asking PBS not to air the panel. Weiner held a news conference Saturday urging the same.

"It is a matter of journalistic ethics and academic excellence to hear the historical facts and not give equal time to air the spurious views of those who deny history," Schiff said Monday.

Although more than 14,000 people have signed an online petition urging PBS not to distribute the discussion produced by Oregon Public Broadcasting and taped a month ago, PBS executives have received only about 200 e-mails on the subject, said spokeswoman Lee Sloan. She said PBS has no plans to withhold distribution of the program, but several stations across the nation, including KOCE in Orange County, are choosing to air the documentary without the panel discussion.

Goldberg said he was puzzled by KCET's decision to air a French documentary instead of his film, adding that the station hosted a fundraiser for his movie in 2004 at which he raised a substantial portion of its budget.

"It's bizarre," he said. "Why they would choose to run a foreign film in the place of my film, and then not air my film at any other time, is a mystery to me."

In fact, Steve Dadaian, the Western region chairman of the Armenian National Committee of America, recommends viewing Goldberg's film, which includes a rarely seen interview with Rafael Lemkin, the Polish Jewish lawyer who coined the term "genocide."

"There's value in the film just for that one interview," said Dadaian, who has viewed both films. "There's no question about it that the French film has more facts. I have no problem with them showing either one. I just don't really understand PBS' position. They feel the documentary is truthful, but they feel they have to follow it with a panel with purported academics on it. It's so stupid."

Sloan said the taxpayer-supported broadcasting service commissioned the panel to help viewers understand the debate about the Armenian deaths, not to raise questions about whether a genocide occurred.



The panel discussion was moderated by National Public Radio host Scott Simon and taped last month at a studio in Washington. One of the participants, Colgate University humanities professor Peter Balakian, said he repeatedly tried to have the session canceled but was told by PBS that the documentary would not air without it. Balakian and Taner Akcam, a visiting professor at the University of Minnesota, take the position that the killings were genocide. Justin A. McCarthy, a history professor at the University of Louisville, and Omer Turan, a history professor at Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey, deny that a genocide took place.

Finding himself between "a rock and a hard place" because he believed that the film was too important to be killed, Balakian agreed to participate.

"This is so ethically horrid," he said. "It's as if we are trying to reshape history and create another side when there is no other side. We figured if we had to put ourselves in such an unethical situation, there was something to be gained by a scholar of Turkish origin and a scholar of Armenian origin speaking together. But the panel is an absurdity, something right out of the world of George Orwell."

At the heart of the protests by the Armenian American community is the point that PBS would never follow a documentary on the genocide of Jews during World War II with a panel of Holocaust deniers. In a Feb. 24 letter to Dadaian, PBS co-chief program executive Jacoba Atlas said the comparison was not analogous because Germany has taken responsibility for the Holocaust.

"Most Americans do not understand what happened to Armenians; too often news organizations have ignored this part of world history," Atlas said. "We strongly believe in the power of truth to come through in debate."
 
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iminhokis
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Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 3321

 PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Quote:
ACCORDING TO TURKISH NEWSPAPER, 65% OF PBS STATIONS AIRED ROND TABLE
FOLLOWING DEMONSTRATION OF "ARMENIAN GENOCIDE"


ISTANUL, APRIL 20, NOYAN TAPAN - ARMENIANS TODAY. The film "The
Armenian Genocide" of Andrew Goldberg was aired on April 17 by the
Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Citing BBC Radio, the newspaper
"Marmara" (Istanbul) reported that over 348 TV stations aired
the film. Prior to the airing, it was announced that many Armenian
organizations and families have assited with the film making. According
to the one-hour film, the mass extermination of the Armenians in Turkey
started in the 1890s under Sultan Abdul Hamid. During their deportation
in 1915, the Armenians were killed on the orders and decison of the
central authorities. Such leaders of "The Young Turks" as Enver Pasha,
Taleat Pasha and Jemal Pasha were sentenced to death and pleaded guilty
to committing the genocide. It is noted that the Armenian massacres
are qualified as a genocide. Taner Akcham, of the Minnesota University
(US), Fatma Myuge Gochek, of Michigan University, historian Halil
Berktai express their opinions in the film, their position on the
issue of the Armenian Genocide differing from the official position
of the Turkish state. The documentary also features some ordinary
citizens of Istanbul and Eastern Anatolia, telling in Turkish or
Kurdish what they heard from their grandparents, undelining that,
to put it simply, these events were massacres. Some young Turks note
that there is no information about such a genocide in the history of
Turkey they know and that "the Turkish people is not the one to have
committed a genocide". At the same time, the Turkish daily "Sabah"
reported in the April 18 issue that following the demonstration of
"The Armenian Genocide", 65% of PBS TV stations aired a round table
with the participation of American Armenian scientist and writer
Piter Balakian and progressive Turkish intelelctual Taner Akcham,
from one side, and such deniers of the Armenian Genocide as Turkish
historian Omer Turan and American historain Justin McCarthy, from the
other. To recap, prior to it, tens of thousands of Armenians from the
US and many other countries called on PBS not to broadcast the round
table, pointing out that the Armenian Genocide is an established fact,
and the issue of whether it was committed indeed should not be made
a subject of debate.




Quote:


Standard-Speaker, PA
April 21 2006

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12397821/

PBS effort to bridge controversy creates more

Presented with programs on Armenian genocide, stations react
differently

Armenian refugees in Ottoman Turkey are shown in a picture featured
in the recent documentary "The Armenian Genocide."


Public television's attempt to illuminate a dark period of European
history is demonstrating that in the world of documentaries, few
topics are black and white.

`The Armenian Genocide' began airing this week on dozens of PBS
stations, including nine in the nation's top TV markets. Through
tattered photos, letters and celebrity voiceovers, the documentary
created by New York-based filmmaker Andrew Goldberg depicts a Turkish
campaign of expulsion, rape, and murder that led to the deaths of an
estimated 1.5 million ethnic Armenians between 1915 and 1920.

To the filmmaker and most historians, the documentary covers settled
history, although Turkey continues to deny that it committed what
many consider the first genocide of the 20th century.

PBS said it accepted Goldberg's film based on the `recognition that
the overwhelming majority of historians have concluded that a
genocide took place.' But to appease a small contingent of critics,
the network commissioned Oregon Public Broadcasting, a partner on the
film, to produce a panel discussion comprising two historians who
back the film's premise and two who dispute it.

Three stations, three approaches
PBS affiliates, which make their own programming decisions, took
different approaches with the programs, in some cases creating even
more unhappiness on both sides.

One of the nation's premier PBS stations, WGBH in Boston, aired
Goldberg's film but declined to show the panel.

`We chose to air `The Armenian Genocide' based on its merits and
because we felt it was balanced and presented both sides of the
story,' said Lucy Sholley, the station's director of media relations.
`We felt the documentary stood on its own.'

KCTS in Seattle aired the film and the panel discussion. Program
manager Eric Maki said in a statement that the station wanted to give
viewers as much information as possible to `make an informed
decision' and `better understand the world around them.'

KCET in Los Angeles, home to about two-thirds of the country's 1.5
million Armenian Americans, declined to show both programs. A
spokeswoman said the station is airing programs on Armenian issues
throughout April and had earlier decided to show a French documentary
called `Le Gռnocide Armռnien.'

On Monday, the day the French film aired, Goldberg screened his
documentary at Hollywood's Egyptian Theatre before an audience
estimated at 1,000.

`I didn't want this story to not have a chance to be shown to the
Armenians in Los Angeles,' he said. `It's a story that many of them
had taken part in, through their involvement or just being connected
with it.'

Panel adds to controversy
The PBS decision to host a panel featuring genocide skeptics has
angered Armenian activists.

`We commend PBS for airing the Goldberg piece. It's a good
opportunity to educate their viewers with regards to the Armenian
genocide. But we felt that the panel that followed it in some areas
was completely unnecessary,' said Elizabeth Chouldjian, spokeswoman
for the Armenian National Committee of America. `It was misleading.
Essentially, it presented the issue of the genocide not as a fact,
but as a debate.'

Chouldjian's organization and others waged a letter-writing campaign
that flooded PBS and congressional offices with requests that the
network drop the panel.

The network stood its ground, however, saying the program's `intent
is to examine the question of how historians can come to such
radically divergent conclusions about these events. An important part
of the mission of public television is to engender responsible
discussion and illuminate complex issues.'


More to the story?
The Turkish government and some historians maintain that Armenians
who died during the violent last throes of the Ottoman Empire where
victims of a civil war, not genocide.

Goldberg's film presents a slanted historical account, according to
some viewers who wrote into PBS stations and a scholar who
participated in the panel discussion.

`If you only take one side and report their deaths, it seems like
genocide. But of course it wasn't that,' said Justin McCarthy, a
professor of history at the University of Louisville.

McCarthy, who acknowledges holding a minority view, believes
Goldberg's film takes a selective snapshot of history and fails to
address the deaths of many Turks at the hands of Armenian militants.

"It was an inhuman, bestial time,' he said. `There were wide-scale,
mutual massacres across eastern and other areas of (the Ottoman
Empire) - a mutual-extermination kind of war.'

PBS said it accepted Goldberg's film based on the `recognition that
the overwhelming majority of historians have concluded that a
genocide took place.' But to appease a small contingent of critics,
the network commissioned Oregon Public Broadcasting, a partner on the
film, to produce a panel discussion comprising two historians who
back the film's premise and two who dispute it.

Three stations, three approaches
PBS affiliates, which make their own programming decisions, took
different approaches with the programs, in some cases creating even
more unhappiness on both sides.

One of the nation's premier PBS stations, WGBH in Boston, aired
Goldberg's film but declined to show the panel.

`We chose to air `The Armenian Genocide' based on its merits and
because we felt it was balanced and presented both sides of the
story,' said Lucy Sholley, the station's director of media relations.
`We felt the documentary stood on its own.'

KCTS in Seattle aired the film and the panel discussion. Program
manager Eric Maki said in a statement that the station wanted to give
viewers as much information as possible to `make an informed
decision' and `better understand the world around them.'

KCET in Los Angeles, home to about two-thirds of the country's 1.5
million Armenian Americans, declined to show both programs. A
spokeswoman said the station is airing programs on Armenian issues
throughout April and had earlier decided to show a French documentary
called `Le Gռnocide Armռnien.'

On Monday, the day the French film aired, Goldberg screened his
documentary at Hollywood's Egyptian Theatre before an audience
estimated at 1,000.

`I didn't want this story to not have a chance to be shown to the
Armenians in Los Angeles,' he said. `It's a story that many of them
had taken part in, through their involvement or just being connected
with it.'

Panel adds to controversy
The PBS decision to host a panel featuring genocide skeptics has
angered Armenian activists.

`We commend PBS for airing the Goldberg piece. It's a good
opportunity to educate their viewers with regards to the Armenian
genocide. But we felt that the panel that followed it in some areas
was completely unnecessary,' said Elizabeth Chouldjian, spokeswoman
for the Armenian National Committee of America. `It was misleading.
Essentially, it presented the issue of the genocide not as a fact,
but as a debate.'

Chouldjian's organization and others waged a letter-writing campaign
that flooded PBS and congressional offices with requests that the
network drop the panel.

The network stood its ground, however, saying the program's `intent
is to examine the question of how historians can come to such
radically divergent conclusions about these events. An important part
of the mission of public television is to engender responsible
discussion and illuminate complex issues.'

More to the story?
The Turkish government and some historians maintain that Armenians
who died during the violent last throes of the Ottoman Empire where
victims of a civil war, not genocide.

Goldberg's film presents a slanted historical account, according to
some viewers who wrote into PBS stations and a scholar who
participated in the panel discussion.

`If you only take one side and report their deaths, it seems like
genocide. But of course it wasn't that,' said Justin McCarthy, a
professor of history at the University of Louisville.

McCarthy, who acknowledges holding a minority view, believes
Goldberg's film takes a selective snapshot of history and fails to
address the deaths of many Turks at the hands of Armenian militants.

"It was an inhuman, bestial time,' he said. `There were wide-scale,
mutual massacres across eastern and other areas of (the Ottoman
Empire) - a mutual-extermination kind of war.'

But among the holdouts for Turkey today are the U.S. and U.K., which
have strong economic and military ties to the nation.

Under recent Republican and Democratic administrations, the U.S. has
avoided using the `G-word,' instead calling the Armenian deaths a
`tragedy' or `atrocity.'

As they come of age, a growing number of Armenian Americans are
demanding the government recognize their ancestors' deaths as
genocide. Filmmakers and Grammy-nominated bands with Armenian roots,
such as System of a Down, have staged benefits calling attention to
the issue. The band and other activists are scheduled to meet with
members of Congress next week to again press their case.

Is change near? Another look at history casts doubt: Nearly every
year federal legislation is introduced. All of the measures have
either died in committees or languished in the Senate.

. 2006 MSNBC Interactive
 
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